More Blood Pressure Screenings, and “What we saw on our way to the Rhinos”

20131006-193906.jpgToday, Sunday, we conducted another Blood Pressure screening for the Masindi Red Cross at 2 more churches. Our total today was 302 people and so altogether between last Sunday and today we took the BP for 652 people. Of these 70% had normal BP’s, 19% were slightly elevated (140-159mmHg systolic or 90-99mmHg diastolic), and 11% had stage 2 high blood pressures of >160 systolic or > 100 diastolic. We gave all the participants a sheet of paper that explained the reading and what to do about it according to the Uganda Clinical Guidelines (which is basically what the USA guidelines would recommend as well). And this was also verbally explained with the help of a translator if necessary. For the first day we only had the cards in English but a health missionary to the Church of Uganda volunteered her personal translator to create a version in Runyoro, the primary local dialect so today we could ask their choice of language. The whole experience of participating in these BP screenings as a way to improve public health has been very rewarding for the students and me! We are truly thankful to the Masindi Red Cross for allowing us to participate. Many of the people had never had their BP taken and a lot of children were interested in finding out their own readings. Even though most of the kids and teens were normal, I think it is great that they are now aware of the ability to monitor BP and when elevated that it can be treated to help prevent heart problems, heart attacks, and stroke. The pictures below are of the “BP Screening Team”. Included are me and my students along with 2 Red Cross staff workers and a local teen (the one with the yellow shirt around his shoulders) who became interested last Sunday and stayed around to help out. Nikko and Jeff taught him all about high blood pressure so he was a real asset when it came to translating and helping with the explanations. Our driver, Sam, also was indispensable. He hung around all day and also assisted in translating at times and today he acted as transport when we had to send a 14 year old to the clinic to be seen for a persistently elevated heart rate of 160.

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NOW CHECK OUT WHAT WE SAW ON OUR WAY TO THE ZIWA RHINO SANTUARY:
Yesterday I wanted to focus on the rhinos since I knew many of your were looking forward to that but we also saw some pretty cool stuff on the way there. First, see how beautiful the day was with blue skies and puffy white clouds.

20131006-214223.jpgNext we saw some monkeys. They are really hard to capture on film because they are so quick.

20131006-214348.jpgWe also saw a mother Ankole cow nursing her calf.

20131006-214543.jpgFinally, check out this video of an Ankole Cattle drive. Note, I didn’t put this to music. I didn’t realize there was music until I played it back for the first time and found out the radio recorded on the video. I burst out laughing because if you look carefully it looks like the cattle are bopping to the music as they walk along.

About kbohan

Professor and Founding Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Binghamton, NY USA
This entry was posted in Diseases/Health, My Safari (My Journey/Adventure) and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to More Blood Pressure Screenings, and “What we saw on our way to the Rhinos”

  1. Karen Geraci says:

    Thanks for the update. It’s so interesting. Love the picture of the monkey and the rhythm of the cows!

    Like

  2. carol acacio says:

    Nice post

    Sent from my iPad

    Like

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