Third Year Pharmacy Students Visit Mulago Hospital

This in not an official U.S. Department of State (DOS) blog and the views and information presented are my own and do not represent the Fulbright Program or the DOS.

On our way to the Upper Campus where Pediatrics is located.

On our way to the Upper Campus where Pediatrics is located.

Today another faculty member, George, and I arranged for the 3rd Year Pharmacy Students to have a tour of Mulago National Referral Hospital with the help of the Pediatric Pharmacist, Helen. Although most of the students had been to Mulago in some capacity before, this was the first time they were going to the Wards to learn about what patients are taken care of on each ward and to learn how to navigate this HUGE hospital complex. It can be a scary place because there are so many people, and you never know what kind of situation you will run into as you go through the halls.

There is a pretty long expanse of covered walkways leading to the Upper Mulago Campus- this is really helpful in the heavy rainy season, as well as to protect from sunlight

There is a pretty long expanse of covered walkways leading to the Upper Mulago Campus- this is really helpful in the heavy rainy season, as well as to protect from sunlight

You may see someone walking with blood dripping from his arm or children whimpering in pain or a woman wailing over the recent death of a loved one. I remember a few years ago one of the first sights my students and I saw at Mulago Hospital was a young child with severe burns over more than ½ of his body. When you are a student and just starting to work in the wards, and not quite sure of your role, it is easy to think that you are just going to be “in the way”. But, the pharmacy students do play a very important role.

Some of the 3rd years near the Pediatric Wards

Some of the 3rd years near the Pediatric Wards

 

They usually have more to spend with the patients and by using their newly learned interview skills, they can find out very helpful information about the details of the medications the patient has been on in the past or how they are tolerating them now.

This is a nutritional soft but solid bar that is given to Mothers for feeding to low weight children, although it could also be used to nourish adults. A typical 2&1/2  year old child might need 2.5 bars per day to get their full nutrition

This is a nutritional soft but solid bar that is given to Mothers for feeding to low weight children, although it could also be used to nourish adults. A typical 2&1/2 year old child might need 2.5 bars per day to get their full nutrition

 

The students can often learn important information that can be provided to the physician and other healthcare providers to help lead to a better health outcome for the patient.

Another group of 3rd year students- we split the class into 3 groups for the tour

Another group of 3rd year students- we split the class into 3 groups for the tour

Next week this new group of pharmacy students will venture to the hospital on their own and start interacting with the patients and caregivers for real.

The final group of 3rd year students headed on the tour.

The final group of 3rd year students headed on the tour.

I told them I know it will be challenging at first but with experience, it will get to be a familiar and enjoyable process. There is a beautiful view overlooking Kampala from the Upper Campus

There is a beautiful view overlooking Kampala from the Upper Campus

 

Another view from Upper Campus

Another view from Upper Campus

About kbohan

Professor and Founding Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Binghamton, NY USA
This entry was posted in Fulbright Specialist Project and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Third Year Pharmacy Students Visit Mulago Hospital

  1. kentodoki1992 says:

    Reblogged this on odokonyero kennedy and commented:
    I was an amazing time

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s